GEL FORCE KNEE SUPPORT

GEL FORCE KNEE SUPPORT
GEL FORCE KNEE SUPPORT GEL FORCE KNEE SUPPORT
Product Code: PROTEC
Availability: In Stock
Price: MYR159.00

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General Application: Great for alleviating knee pain and providing moderate knee joint stability.

Medical Applications: Patello-Femoral pain syndrome,Patellar tracking, chondromalacia, minor meniscus andligament tears.

How It Works: Provides patellar (knee cap) stability with compression surrounding patella. Offers stability on medial and lateral sides of knee.

Design Theory: Breathable, soft fabric offers 4 way stretch applying even, comfortable compression throughout brace. Thick oval gel provides excellent comfort and support to patellar (knee cap) area. Medial (inside) and lateral (outside) spiral stays offer overall knee joint stability.

Sizes:
Small (13” – 14”)
Medium (14” – 16")
Large (16” – 18”)
Xlarge (18” – 20")
(Circumference measured 1” above top of patella)

Patello-Femoral Pain
Medical Definition: Pain associated with maltracking of the patella (kneecap). Can lead to subluxation or chondromalacia.

 

Causes: Any activity that causes repetitive strain to the knee area, such as excessive running. Improper foot biomechanics (pronation) may also strain the knee, effecting the tracking of the patella.

Symptoms: Dull ache in front of knee. Pain under and around patella, especially when walking up stairs. Often accompanied by crepitus (grinding, clicking). Buckling or locking of knee may occur.

Recommended Treatment: Reduce activity to promote healing. Ice knee area pre or post activity to reduce inflammation and pain. Strengthening and stretching exercises are advisable under the advise of a medical professional. Wearing a knee support may reduce strain to area. As with any orthopedic injury, a consultation with a medical professional is recommended.

Patellar Subluxation and Dislocation
Medical Definition: Subluxation - The patella partially coming off of its track.
Dislocation - The patella entirely coming off of its track.

 

Causes: Patellar Subluxation may be caused by Iliotibial Band Syndrome, trauma-such as a twisting injury, or general malalignment of the patella. Patellar Dislocation is usually due to a traumatic injury - such as a blow to the knee.

Symptoms: Pain in the patellar region.

Recommended Treatment: R.I.C.E. - Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Strengthening of surrounding muscles to help absorb shock to the knee. A proper stretching (Quadriceps, Iliotibial Band) routine is highly recommended pre and post workouts. Apply Ice for 10-15 minutes after each workout to reduce inflammation and pain. (If any skin irritation or adverse reaction occurs due to icing, see your medical doctor).

Chondromalacia
Medical Definition: Wearing away and/or softening of the articular cartilage, which is a connective tissue that covers and protects the underside of the patella, the bottom end of the femur, and top end of the tibia. It absorbs stress to the knee joint and allows the patella to track smoothly in its femoral groove.

 

Causes: Excessive running or similar activity can wear down the articular cartilage over time. This can occur due to the patella not tracking smoothly in its femoral groove.

Symptoms: Pain around the patella (kneecap), usually occurring on the medial (inner) side and below.

Recommended Treatment: R.I.C.E. - Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Reduce activity to promote healing. Avoid downhill runs especially. Strengthen surrounding muscles with a professionally recommended program. Apply Ice for 10-15 minutes after each workout to reduce inflammation and pain. A proper stretching routine is highly recommended pre and post workouts. As with any orthopedic injury, a consultation with a sports medicine professional is recommended.

Meniscal Tear
Medical Definition: Tear to either the medial or lateral meniscus. The meniscus is the shock absorbing cartilage in the center of your knee.

 

Traumatic Cause: A sudden hit to the outside of the knee area may cause a tear to the meniscus.

Degenerative: Over time the meniscus may deteriorate or soften, increasing the likelihood of injury. In this case, a sudden twist or turn may cause injury.

Recommended Treatment: Reduce activity to promote healing. Ice, as recommended by a medical professional. Certain stretching and strengthening exercises may be beneficial. Wearing a knee support may provide some warm, compression and stability to enhance the healing process. As with any orthopedic injury, please seek a complete evaluation from a medical professional.

Ligament Injuries
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury:

 

Medical Definition: Tearing of the ACL. The ACL is a ligament that connects the tibia to the femur and is necessary to help stabilize the knee joint area. Causes: ACL injuries may occur in many different situations but are often caused by a sudden hit to the knee or a pivoting (change in direction) injury.

Symptoms: Pain (will vary depending on injury severity) and swelling. Instability to the knee joint area.

Recommended Treatment: ACL injuries demand immediate medical attention. Depending upon the severity of the injury, surgery may be required. Range of motion exercises, ice and physical therapy are recommended before and after surgery (if required).

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injury:

Medical Definition: Tear to the medial collateral ligament. The MCL is located on the inside of the knee, while the lateral collateral ligament(LCL) is located on the outside of the knee. Injury to the MCL is more common than injury to the LCL.

Causes: Twisting injury to the knee or a blow to the outside of the knee, often occurring in sports.

Symptoms: Pain and swelling. Requires evaluation by a medical professional.

Recommended Treatment: Follow advice from a medical professional. MCL injuries are usually not as serious as a ACL injury.

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